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Scott Lawin Arcenas

Scott Lawin Arcenas

PhD Candidate - Ancient History
A.B. Princeton University, 2009
MPhil University of Cambridge, 2011

Scott Lawin Arcenas is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Classics at Stanford University. A native of Casper, WY, Scott earned an A.B. from Princeton, summa cum laude, in 2009. He then taught Latin at Sturgis Charter Public School, in Hyannis, MA. Upon being awarded a Gates Cambridge Scholarship, he matriculated at Clare College, Cambridge, where he earned an MPhil, with distinction, in Ancient History.  

Scott’s primary research interest is the intersection of political and economic history in the Greco-Roman world. In his first two years at Stanford, he worked under the direction of Walter Scheidel on ORBIS, The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World. Most notably, he developed the algorithm that underlies all maritime transportation. He is currently writing a dissertation, advised by Josiah Ober, that seeks to determine the nature, frequency, and intensity of stasis, commonly translated as civil conflict or civil war, on the poleis of classical and early Hellenistic Greece.

Scott is also interested in comparative and quantitative approaches to pre-modern history, political theory, technical numismatics, and the disciplinary histories of Ancient History, Classics, and Classical Archaeology.

Scott’s primary teaching interests are the history and literature of the Greco-Roman World. He has served as both teaching assistant and primary instructor in lecture courses on Greek and Roman History. He has also taught translation courses in both Intermediate and Advanced Greek. Outside of the classroom, he has served as a departmental liaison to the Stanford Center for Teaching and Learning and a graduate facilitator at the Stanford Humanities House.

In addition to his academic responsibilities, Scott has served as a Community Associate at the Graduate Life Office and on the Board of Directors of the Stanford Alumni Association.