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Projects Overview

Summary by Michael Shanks, Fall 2009 This past summer began a major archaeological project focused on the northern edges of the Roman empire in Britain. An international team drawn principally from Stanford and Durham University UK started excavating the Roman fort and town at Binchester and exploring its place in one of the richest archaeological landscapes in the world. Stanford graduates and undergraduates are making key contributions to the project, pursuing personal research interests as well as working throughout the survey, excavation and lab teams. Known to the Romans as Vinovium (“On...
Forma Urbis Romae
The Forma Urbis Romae (or Severan Marble Plan) is a crucial resource for studying the ancient city of Rome. Enormous in size and astonishingly detailed, it contains irreplaceable information about the city in the early 3rd c. CE--its famous monuments and its lesser-known neighborhoods, its major streets and its back alleys, its commercial infrastructure and its religious life. The Plan also tells us about ancient Roman ideas of the city, ideologies of representation, and mapping and surveying. The more we know about the Marble Plan, the more we know about imperial Rome. Unfortunately, only 10...
Stanford University joined the Monte Polizzo project in 1999, when Michael Shanks and Emma Blake brought a dozen Stanford students to Salemi, Sicily and began analysis of finds from the 1998 excavations. In 2000, Ian Morris began excavating on the acropolis with students from Stanford and other universities and volunteers from Salemi, Corleone, and Marsala. In 2001 Jennifer Trimble carried out a magnetometry survey, and by 2002 the acropolis excavation had become one of the largest archaeological projects in the west Mediterranean, with a staff of more than eighty people, drawn from the US,...

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